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Swift Water Rescue

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Swift Water Rescue


Swift water rescue is a highly specialized technique that requires extensive training and experience. If you are not trained, do not attempt a swift water rescue and instead call for help and work as a team. However, if you are trained, here are the steps for making a swift water rescue:


  1. Assess the situation: Before attempting a rescue, assess the situation to determine the best course of action. Take into account factors such as the current, depth, and obstacles in the water. Make sure that you are not putting yourself or others at risk.
  2. Use a throw bag: If the person in distress is within reach, use a throw bag to reach them. A throw bag is a bag filled with rope that is thrown to the person in need.
  3. Secure yourself: If you are entering the water, secure yourself to a rope or anchor to prevent being swept away by the current. If you are performing a rescue from another boat make sure you are secure and stabilized within the boat. Do not risk another flip or bail if at all possible. Make the situation better not worse.
  4. Attach a rescue rope: Once you reach the person in distress, attach a rescue rope to them to prevent them from being swept away by the current.
  5. Pull the person to safety: Once the person is attached to the rescue rope, work with your team to pull them to safety.
  6. If absolutely necessary to save a life, swim to the person in distress: If the person is not within reach, swim to them using the "swim and flip" technique, which involves swimming on your back and flipping over to face the current when needed. Keep their head above water and swim to shore horizontally to the current using a one armed backstroke with your other arm under the armpits of the person being rescued. Do not put yourself in unnecessary danger and cause a situation in which two rescues are needed.
  7. Provide medical attention: If necessary, provide medical attention to the person you have rescued.


It is important to note that swift water rescues can be extremely dangerous and should only be attempted by trained and experienced professionals.


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